google earth

Can Google Earth Cams Be Used Against You in a Car Accident Lawsuit?

With the constant state of surveillance under which we all seem to find ourselves, people are rarely surprised to discover that they have been caught on camera. How invasive the surveillance goes and how it can be used in court are questions that many people find they have when it comes to legal matters.

Google Earth cams being used against you in court isn’t something you should be too concerned about. Google Earth cams are often used in car accident cases, but footage of the accident taken from these cameras is not.

Google Earth Is Not Constantly Watching

While most people appear on camera plenty during the day, your odds of making an appearance on Google Earth are not high. Every day the average American is caught on camera a whopping 70 times. While you can check out pictures covering the globe with Google Earth, you are not seeing a live feed.

On average, the pictures you see with Google Earth are updated every one to three years. Your chances of ever being caught on a Google Earth cam are pretty slim (unless you remain outside in the same small area for months on end).

How Google Earth Is Used in Court

The fact that Google Earth is incredibly unlikely to have taken a picture at the precise moment of your collision does not mean that you won’t see pictures from Google Earth used in a car accident case against you.

In the past, attorneys would often use maps or 3D models in car accident cases in order to try to give the judge and jury a clear view of the scene of the accident. They are used to attempt to disprove any claims made about factors of the scene that may have contributed to the accident.

Now, these maps and models are often taken from Google Earth footage to help show a more accurate view of the scene.

Other Video Footage May Be Available

While there won’t be footage of your accident taken from Google Earth, that doesn’t mean that the accident wasn’t recorded on camera. In fact, if your accident occurred in the heart of a major city, more likely than not, the crash was caught on camera.

Social Media Is a Much Greater Threat

While Google Earth is unlikely to be of much use to opposing counsel, aside from setting the scene, there are other ways in which the internet can be used against you in a car accident lawsuit.

One of the first things that attorneys tend to do when planning a case is to research their opponent. These days, that research begins with social media. Anytime you are dealing with any legal situation, some of the best advice you will receive is to stay off social media. While you may be making a post that you feel is completely innocuous, opposing counsel may be able to find a way to use it against you.

The safest course of action to protect yourself is always to simply steer clear. While increasing your privacy settings to the highest level will help protect you, there are still no guarantees that your account won’t end up hurting you if you continue to use it.

A Car Accident Lawyer Is Your Best Protection

Whatever your situation, in a car accident lawsuit, the opposing counsel will be looking for anything they can use against you. The best protection you have at your disposal is to hire an experienced car accident lawyer to represent you and your interests.

Contact a car accident attorney in Los Angeles for a free consultation. Your lawyer will go over all of your options with you and together you can map out a plan for how to proceed.

Whether you are the one filing a lawsuit or a car accident lawsuit has been filed against you, the stakes in a serious accident are going to be high. Having a competent car accident attorney on your side will help protect you and make sure you get the maximum compensation to which you are entitled.

About the Author

Maureen Lunde is a writer with Jacob & Meyers Law Offices. She has dedicated her career to represent the most common car events, personal injuries, and other related topics. 

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