The Government’s Dark Data: A Decade of Discovery

Joe Looby recently released his documentary The Decade of Discovery about the United States versus Philip Morris tobacco lawsuit in the early 2000s and email e-discovery issues. The film also discusses the emergence of the Sedona Conference as a think tank and forum for discussion about cooperation in e-discovery. Many prominent federal judges were interviewed about the issues with open government and record keeping. Also in the documentary, Jason R. Baron, Esq. talks about open government, record keeping at the White House, and how the e-discovery issues played out in the lawsuit. We are beginning to wonder, in this world of big data, how are we dealing with information governance, specifically within issues of open government and data security?

In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Jason Baron about information governance, dark data, open government, and his role in The Decade of Discovery. Baron talks about the increasing amount of electronic data affecting the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and the discussion e-discovery experts need to have about providing public access to government records. There is a mandate, he explains, that after 2019, all federal agencies must provide all of their permanent records to the archives in electronic or digital form. Because of this, systems and sophisticated software will be required to properly filter and provide access to the data. Baron also discusses information governance as a whole, including privacy, security, discovery, management, and the need for a Chief Information Governance Officer (CIGO) going into the future. He concludes by praising Richard Braman, a leader in the e-discovery industry, for founding the Sedona Conference and creating the Cooperation Proclamation.

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