How to Choose a Legal Case Management Software

So, your law firm is at ABA TECHSHOW looking for a new practice management solution. Whether you’re sick of the disorganization, or simply looking to modernize, choosing software is not a decision to be taken lightly.

Nearly 50% of lawyers looking for practice management software have never used it before. Even for those who have, it’s difficult to know where to start. To ensure satisfaction with your new investment, take these tips into consideration.

Determine Your Needs and Wants

Above all, your new software should be able to help solve most of your law firm’s problems. Before beginning your search, draft a list of challenges your firm is facing. Staff will use the new software too, so include them in the process. Ask them to come up with their own features checklists related to their responsibilities.

Common pain points include:

  • Following up with clients
  • Tracking marketing campaigns
  • Task management
  • Tracking statutes and other deadlines

Thinking about problems you want to solve, before doing any research, helps your law firm identify its challenges without outside influence. You want to tell software companies what you need—not the other way around.

It’s also important to distinguish between wants and needs and to prioritize accordingly. Your new case management software should accommodate all of your needs, and most or some of your wants.

Cloud vs. Server Solutions

While most modern solutions are cloud-based, there are still some server solutions available. Server-based solutions are located on a server inside your law firm. Some firms like this option because they have total control over their server, but it comes with the responsibility and cost buying and maintaining the hardware.

Modern firms are increasingly drawn to flexible cloud solutions. These solutions store data in servers maintained by the software provider. They can be accessed securely from anywhere with an Internet connection and are easier to scale.

For more detailed information on cloud and server solutions, read our blog post.

Case Management Software Demo

After identifying your features wish list and researching your options, schedule demos with a few of the most promising choices. Most companies offer free demos, which you should take advantage of.

A walk-through with a knowledgeable sales person is essential for you and your team to properly evaluate any case management solution.

Ask About Support & Ease of Use

As with any transition, there are bound to be some bumps in the road. An intuitive case management solution will make the move to new software much easier. The user-friendly software requires less training, saving you time and money during implementation and with each new hire.

No matter how intuitive a solution is, your firm will still require training and ongoing support to get the most out of it. Consider the availability, scope, and cost of training when making your decision.

Case Management Software Cost

New software is a big investment, so it’s no surprise law firms are concerned about the cost of their final choice. A new practice management solution is an investment.

Be sure to ask if there are set-up fees or costs associated with training. These can significantly raise the overall budget for your firm.

Choosing the right case management software for your practice is a decision that can affect your growth for years to come. With these tips in mind, you are well on your way to becoming a more efficient, more successful law firm.

CASEpeer is a comprehensive case management solution for personal injury attorneys. Features include intake management, organized cases, task management, conflict checks, statute tracking, rules-based calendaring, powerful reports, and more.

This is a guest post from CASEpeer. Visit them at ABA TECHSHOW in the EXPO Hall at Booth #512 and learn more about the Conference

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