Ethics and Social Media in Court

Like the rest of the population, lawyers can find themselves spending considerable amounts of time online and on social media platforms. Additionally, like all of us, they can make serious mistakes on these platforms, including malpractice, ethical breaches subject to discipline, breach of fiduciary duty, and monetary damages.

In Ethics and Social Media in Court, attorney Claude Ducloux, director of education, ethics, and compliance for LawPay, will explore a number of potential pitfalls for attorneys when it comes to social media, including the dangers associated with disregarding confidentiality, unethical information gathering, failure to assert client control, evidence preservation and spoliation, ethical conduct involving jurors, and the impact of what attorneys share on social media themselves.

We will also explore and examine a variety of real-world cases demonstrating the many ways lawyers have intentionally or unintentionally breached the rules of ethics or trial procedure with the use of common social media platforms and messaging apps. Following, we’ll discuss how these problems are being addressed by various State Bar Disciplinary Systems.

Wednesday, October 25th
2:00pm – 2:30pm ET

Free Registration

Learning Objectives:

  • How social media can lead to breaches of fiduciary duty
  • How social media can create conflicts of interest
  • The ethics involved in asking for online reviews
  • How social media concerns are being addressed by various
  • State Bar Disciplinary Systems

Sponsored by:

 

Please note, this is a non-CLE webinar.
Image is from ShutterStock.com.

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Law Technology Today

Law Technology Today is the official legal technology blog from the ABA Legal Technology Resource Center (LTRC). Law Technology Today provides lawyers and other legal professionals with current, practical and innovative content developed by some of the leading voices on legal technology.

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