E-Discovery Reflections from Retired Magistrate Judge John Facciola

John M. Facciola is a retired United States Magistrate Judge who formerly served in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. He has authored over 700 opinions, many of them in e-discovery and in the impact of information technology upon Fourth Amendment principles. With an inside knowledge of how e-discovery directly affects lawyers and cases, he is highly qualified to discuss the significant technological shift occurring in the world of law.

On this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Judge Facciola about why lawyers need to learn about e-discovery now, how we can integrate e-discovery training into law schools and ongoing legal education, and the importance of law firms investing in professional development and creativity.

Topics Include:

  • Embracing the future of legal technology to avoid falling behind
  • Clinicians, physicians, coders, and health records
  • Craig Ball and the the Electronic Discovery Training Academy
  • Discrete e-discovery courses, topic integration, or a bootcamp
  • Using wit and humor as a judge
  • Keeping up with the people you represent culturally and technologically
  • Creative financial models and being proactive in litigation
  • Cooperation and transparency in e-discovery

Judge John Facciola is a member of the Sedona Conference Advisory Board and has received the Sedona Conference’s Lifetime Achievement Award. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown Law where he teaches Information Technology, Modern Litigation, and a course in Evidence.

About Law Technology Today

Law Technology Today

Law Technology Today is the official legal technology blog from the ABA Legal Technology Resource Center (LTRC). Law Technology Today provides lawyers and other legal professionals with current, practical and innovative content developed by some of the leading voices on legal technology.

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