ABA TECHSHOW 2014 News Roundup

Since Engadget wasn’t sure, yes, ABA TECHSHOW is a thing. A big thing in the legal technology space, and this year was no exception.

It kicked off with LexThink, where lawyers and legal professional gave six minute presentations on what they consider the end of irrelevance.

For a run down of sessions, and the plenary that featured John W. Dean, White House Counsel to President Nixon, check both Lawyerist and The Droid Lawyer. They lived-blogged during the course of the conference, neither quite covering the same sessions while providing some interesting and entertaining commentary along the way.

Walking the vendor hall, you cannot help but be struck by the practice management offerings. As Sam Glover points out on Lawyerist, the future of practice management is in the cloud.  ABA TECHSHOW is also where companies like to make product announcements, and Bob Ambrogi has a nice list of some of the big ones, and some new entrants like LawPal.

The keynote this year was Rick Klau, of Google Ventures. His presentation covered three points:

  1. Data > Opinion
  2. Just Say No
  3. Think Big

The LexBlog Network has a good recap of the keynote, complete with tweets.

No ABA TECHSHOW is complete without schawg. The ABA Journal has a brief write-up on this year’s schwag, but check out its photo gallery to get a real sense of what was cool this year.

On a different note, Kevin O’Keefe provides some interesting commentary on how legal technology companies are starved for social media coverage.

About Law Technology Today

Law Technology Today
Law Technology Today is the official legal technology blog from the ABA Legal Technology Resource Center (LTRC). Law Technology Today provides lawyers and other legal professionals with current, practical and innovative content developed by some of the leading voices on legal technology.

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